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IE9 doesn't seem to understand background-color

I have recently created my first website using HTML5. I have used some CSS3 attributes like box-shadow and border-radius, and they render correctly in all browsers except IE.
IE is retarded. To enable some HTML5 features in IE I used this code snippet:
<!--[if IE]>
<script src="http://html5shim.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/html5.js" ></script>
<![endif]-->
While IE8 correctly positioned the elements, it still doesn't support CSS3. Below is a preview of IE8:
Fullscreen_capture_9
However, IE9 preview, which brags about it's HTML5 support didn't even render the background-color correctly. What a shame. Surely it's a preview, but it should be better and not worse than IE8. On the bright side, the rest of the CSS, even the CSS3 tags, rendered correctly. See the rounded borders and shadow (looks like a glow) around the image:


Fullscreen_capture_9

I am hoping that Microsoft fixes this bug, because regardless this bug the work they have done with hardware acceleration and HTML5 support is amazing.
All other browsers, including Opera, Firefox 3.6 and Chrome  rendered everything correctly. FF 3.0 and Chrome 3 rendered the layout correctly but had only partial CSS3 support.
Here is what the website should look like (Chrome 7 dev):


Dude_wheres_my_shirt_-_google_chrome_9
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